If you feel you must fit the hammer/trigger/spring kit yourself.

As you know we will fit the hammer/trigger/spring kit into your trigger housing and return the old parts to you at no charge. Here are a few tips if you wish to do the job yourself. The mechanical job of fitting the parts is not too difficult but making adjustments that may be required to the original Beretta parts and getting the final adjustments correct is a little more tricky.

Trigger Parts

If you receive the kit as individual parts in plastic bags then the trigger adjustment screw will not be installed in the trigger. This is because the screw is coated with blue Loctite compound which hardens after the screw has been in position for about 12 hours. If we shipped the trigger with the screw in place the Loctite would harden before you received the parts.

There are two threaded holes in the aluminum trigger, one is for the screw used to adjust the trigger "pre-travel" and this screw is used with both the plastic and aluminum trigger housings, the other screw is used to adjust the trigger "overtravel" and this screw is used only with our aluminum trigger housing.

The "pre-travel" adjustment screw position is shown below.

Using the small Allen wrench supplied with the parts kit screw the trigger adjustment screw into position so that the tip of the screw is flush with the rear face of the trigger (in the cavity at the rear of the trigger). Assemble the trigger/trigger spring/hammer linkage/trigger pivot pin group into the trigger housing. Hammer Parts Replacing the hammer parts should be fairly straight forward. Initial Adjustments. Now the job gets a little more tricky. We need to make initial adjustments to the trigger adjustment screw before we continue. This is a critical adjustment. This is probably how the catch at the rear of the trigger housing will look at this point.

Using the small Allen wrench supplied with the parts kit screw the trigger adjustment screw into position so that the tip of the screw is flush with the rear face of the trigger (in the cavity at the rear of the trigger). Assemble the trigger/trigger spring/hammer linkage/trigger pivot pin group into the trigger housing.

Hammer Parts

Replacing the hammer parts should be fairly straight forward.

Initial Adjustments.

Now the job gets a little more tricky. We need to make initial adjustments to the trigger adjustment screw before we continue. This is a critical adjustment.

This is probably how the catch at the rear of the trigger housing will look at this point.

Note that the little hook is in the fully engaged position. Now, screw in the trigger adjustment screw until it starts to contact the trigger housing body. This will take a little movement initially since the screw was deliberately pre-set to provide clearance between the screw and the housing to ease assembly (see above). As the screw contacts the trigger housing body the little hook will start to move down in its slot. Stop screw adjustment when the top of the hook is level with the bottom of the metal plate, as below.

Note that the little hook is in the fully engaged position. Now, screw in the trigger adjustment screw until it starts to contact the trigger housing body. This will take a little movement initially since the screw was deliberately pre-set to provide clearance between the screw and the housing to ease assembly (see above). As the screw contacts the trigger housing body the little hook will start to move down in its slot. Stop screw adjustment when the top of the hook is level with the bottom of the metal plate, as below.

This will be the starting adjustment position for the trigger adjustment screw. At this point you should be able to push the hammer down with your thumb and cock the action and you should be able to pull the trigger and release the hammer. If you cannot cock the hammer easily then screw the trigger adjusting screw in SLOWLY until you can just do this. If you screw the trigger adjusting screw in too far the trigger will not reset correctly in live fire use. Next, fit the sear clip. Because of the extra thickness of the metal clip you will probably now not be able to cock the hammer with your thumb. If this is the case screw the trigger adjustment screw in a little further until you can do this. You now have the trigger adjusted for range testing. Assemble the gun and check trigger operation. There will be trouble-shooting tips in the next post.

This will be the starting adjustment position for the trigger adjustment screw. At this point you should be able to push the hammer down with your thumb and cock the action and you should be able to pull the trigger and release the hammer. If you cannot cock the hammer easily then screw the trigger adjusting screw in SLOWLY until you can just do this. If you screw the trigger adjusting screw in too far the trigger will not reset correctly in live fire use. Next, fit the sear clip. Because of the extra thickness of the metal clip you will probably now not be able to cock the hammer with your thumb. If this is the case screw the trigger adjustment screw in a little further until you can do this. You now have the trigger adjusted for range testing. Assemble the gun and check trigger operation.

There will be trouble-shooting tips in the next post.